Novopeskovskii (Novo-Peskovskii) Concentration Camp

Address: 5 Novo-Peskovskii Lane, Moscow

The Novopeskovskii Concentration Camp was opened on May 1, 1919 near the corner of Protochnyi and Bolshoy Novo-Peskovskii lanes (where the British Embassy is now located).

Camp “near the Smolensk market” (as it was officially called in documents)

Camp “near the Smolensk market” (as it was officially called in documents)

In the autumn of 1919, the camp became a central transit camp—prisoners from different places and institutions were assembled there and then transported to other concentration camps. As a result, the Novopeskovskii camp received prisoners around the clock.

The number of prisoners in Moscow’s largest concentration camp varied: in the beginning, around 300–400 people were imprisoned there; later, there were more than 500 inmates. From May 1919 until January 1920, altogether 5,797 prisoners passed through the camp.

House on the corner of Bolshoi Novo-Perekovskii Lane. This three-story building stood on the site where the camp was founded.

House on the corner of Bolshoi Novo-Perekovskii Lane. This three-story building stood on the site where the camp was founded.

 

In addition to being assembled and transported to other camps, some prisoners were kept imprisoned there. Among them were not only counter-revolutionaries, but also ordinary criminals. Inhabitants of the village of Tambov formed a separate group. They were peasants’ relatives and family members who were suspected of participating in the Tambov rebellion. According to Tukhachevskii’s command, numerous hostages were imprisoned, as well as Poles and Hungarians (from July 1922).

Other view of the house on the corner of Protochnyi and Bolshoi Novo-Peskovskii lanes. The camp was set up in a similar building.

Other view of the house on the corner of Protochnyi and Bolshoi Novo-Peskovskii lanes. The camp was founded in a similar building.

Shoemaking, tailoring, and laundry workshops were established in the Novopeskovskii Concentration Camp in 1921. A camp theater was also created and is mentioned in sources from 1919. It visited police clubs and other camps to perform its plays.

Participants of the Tambov rebellion

Participants of the Tambov rebellion

With the elimination of Moscow’s concentration camps in the the spring of 1923, Novopeskovskii was renamed as an arrest house. It was closed along with other arrest houses in 1924.

City pumping plant on the corner of Protochnyi and Bolshoi Novo-Peskovskii lanes. A similar fence surrounded the Novopeskovskii camp.

City pumping plant on the corner of Protochnyi and Bolshoi Novo-Peskovskii lanes. A similar fence surrounded the Novopeskovskii camp.

Yevgeniy Natarov